In The News …

Why Low-Income Kids Miss Out On Play (DCentric): “‘Free play’ helps boost childhood development and leads to better behavior in schools. But a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics found low-income children in cities have limited opportunities to play [...] Low-income kids are more likely to see recess cut from their school day [and] there are fewer playgrounds in low-income, urban communities [and] Parents are busy insuring their families? day-to-day survival.” So definitely get to know the Homeless Children’s Playtime Project, whose 100+ volunteers give children a much-needed opportunity to play and relax.

Why Community Health Centers Matter (Chronicle of Philanthropy): “While the healthcare political battles continue in Washington and around the country, nonprofit and philanthropic organizations can’t wait for government wheels to turn. Health-care providers in low-income communities are seeing dramatic increases in demand for services: One center I visited recently has a waiting list of 3,000 patients. For investors of any kind looking to make an immediate social impact on communities in need and introduce greater efficiency into the market, health-care centers are a great deal.” Similarly, search CFP’s health and mental health nonprofits (including free and mobile clinics) right here.

DC behind schedule in meeting Race to the Top promises (Washington Post): “In the first year of Race to the Top, the Obama administration’s signature effort to reform education, Maryland met its obligations, but the District has fallen behind schedule because of leadership turnover within its school administration [...] Federal officials found that Maryland, Massachusetts, and Ohio had delivered what they promised in the first year of the four-year program [...] ‘Over the last year, DC made a great deal of progress while also facing some setbacks,’ Education Secretary Arne Duncan said.” Let us know if you have opinions (or experiences) with Race to the Top in Maryland or DC.

Candlelight Vigil Salutes the Fallen of 2011 (Afro-American Newspapers): “[CFP nonprofit] The Northeast Performing Arts Group in partnership with Survivors of Homicide and the African Heritage Dancers & Drummers hosted a candlelight vigil on New Year’s Eve in memory of the homicide victims of 2011 [...] Participants in the vigil held a lit candle to commemorate each of the young people ages 25 and under that were killed in the District this year.” And executive director of Survivors of Homicide Inc., Julia Dunkins, declared at the vigil: “We all must continue the work of stopping senseless murders.”

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